The issue of nursing shortages and the efforts to counter it

Resources on the Nursing Shortage Introduction: Front-page newspaper stories paint a picture of a nursing shortage born of increased patient loads and escalating pressure to treat more people, more quickly, for less money. Second, highly visible patient and professional complaints about managed care in the early s have discouraged young people from entering the nursing profession. These complaints have led many guidance counselors to advise students not to enter the profession.

The issue of nursing shortages and the efforts to counter it

Stewart Lawrence Running head: However, these roles are often quite distinct Kelly,pp.

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Leaders are responsible for articulating and promoting a vision; they inspire and motivate hospital managers and staff, but generally have little involvement in day-to-day affairs. Managers, on the other hand are deeply immersed in these affairs, and must be able to organize time, money and resources efficiently.

Good managers should exhibit some leadership abilities, especially in their area of functional responsibility. Unlike leaders, they are not responsible for the overall direction of an organization and its operations, though their input into strategic planning processes may be vital. These shortages have proven unusually persistent despite the best efforts of nursing administrators and their staff.

Managers that focus on day-to-day problem solving and on the efficient use of available resources are likely to address this issue with a more short-term perspective.

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Leaders, on the other hand, are more likely to take a longer-term view of the problem and to seek more enduring solutions. They may also intervene with existing nursing staff in a different way.

The issue of nursing shortages and the efforts to counter it

In the end, both approaches are needed. How best to combine them is the central issue.

The issue of nursing shortages and the efforts to counter it

Addressing Nursing Shortages For more than a decade, the American health care industry has sounded the alarm about current and future nursing shortages. The problem is partly a demographic one.

As the unusually large baby-boomer generation ages, it requires a large-scale increase in nursing care. On source estimates that million additional patients will enter into Medicare each year.

Federal funding to support nursing students is being reduced even as more candidates are available for placement. In addition, there are shortages of teachers in nursing education programs; some 76, students were turned away inaccording to one report.

Finally, an older generation of nurses is reaching retirement age and needs to be replaced just as the demand for more nurses is growing and the pipeline of new nurses shrinking.

These solutions are in keeping with their problem-solving approach as managers. Between andrequests for travel nurses tripled nationwide. Hospital human resource managers and nursing staffs are also getting more creative in how they recruit temporary contract numbers.

The traditional solution is to rely on an external staffing agency, which can prove costly and requires incoming personnel to spend time getting oriented to new hospital staff and procedures.

The float polls and bid down the temporary contract rate and also draws on nurses already familiar with hospital staff and procedures, as well as their long-term patients.

There are at least two other short-term solutions. One is to institute mandatory overtime and extended shifts for existing nursing personnel. These short-term solutions can fill a gap but they raise addition issues, including rising labor costs, staff burn-out, and the quality of patient care.

For example, while the float pools are cheaper than external agencies, the rates paid are higher than current staff salaries. In fact, the appeal of making more money appears to be leading as growing number of nurses to pursue contracting — especially travel nursing -- over permanent nursing staff positions.

Studies suggest that the use of contract personnel has failed to close the gap in staffing. Mandatory overtime can also prove highly counter-productive over the long-haul. However, real leadership on this problem requires a longer-term vision and a more strategic approach. One key element is to address the crisis in the nursing education system.

Efforts need to be made to retain existing faculty and while strengthening financial support for students interested in attending nursing school.

For example, New Jersey and Georgia have established special programs that identify nursing students in their first year as prospective faculty and incentivize them to pursue teaching as well as nurse practitioner careers.

Some hospitals are creating their own in-house nursing schools or sharing staffs among each other in such a way that nurses are freed up to serve as part-time faculty.

Some nursing schools have created new PhD programs that are drawing more nurses to the teaching profession Ingeno, Director's Corner Podcasts: Drug r-bridal.com Woodcock discusses what the agency is doing to address the issue of drug shortages, and how the agency is working with industry to help lessen their.

These shortages have proven unusually persistent despite the best efforts of nursing administrators and their staff. Managers that focus on day-to-day problem solving and on the efficient use of available resources are likely to address this issue with a more short-term perspective.

An Analysis into Nursing Shortages and Counter Solutions Ref: nursing The following dissertation examines the shortage of nurses in NHS and identifies the various factors that are causing this phenomenon of short supply of nurses.

Worker shortages—always a problem, but now becoming more acute in many areas—are forcing employers to boost retention efforts and rethink recruiting strategies. These shortages have proven unusually persistent despite the best efforts of nursing administrators and their staff.

Managers that focus on day-to-day problem solving and on the efficient use of available resources are likely to address this issue with a more short-term perspective. This article provides an assessment of strategies implemented nationwide to counter the nursing faculty shortage, highlights those indicating most promise, and proposes a basis for evaluating outcomes.

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